Port of San Diego Pacific Northwest Shellfish Tour September 7-8, 2017

Port of San Diego Pacific Northwest Shellfish Tour September 7-8, 2017 – Prepared by: Paula Sylvia

The Port of San Diego extends our sincerest and heartfelt gratitude to the Pacific Coast Shellfish Growers Association and all the members that we were able to visit during our tour of different segments of the shellfish industry in Washington from September 7-8, 2017. 

As a background, in 2015, the Port initiated a new Aquaculture and Blue Technology Program to explore new environmental and economic opportunities in and around San Diego Bay for both industry sectors. In 2016, the Port established a Blue Economy Incubator and strategic investment fund to assist in the creation, development, and scaling of new ventures on San Diego Bay. The Blue Economy incubator provides an open invitation to early stage and market-ready ventures that align with the incubator objectives to submit business and pilot project proposals as the first stage of a four step competitive review process. On June 20, 2017 the Board of Port Commissioners approved the first four agreements for pilot projects through the incubator, one of which was with San Diego Bay Aquaculture to operate a Flupsy for shellfish nursery operations in San Diego Bay.  More information on the incubator process can be found at https://www.portofsandiego.org/business/blue-economy-incubator.html.

Becky Mabardy from PCSGA was instrumental in understanding the scope of the Port’s interest and designing and coordinating an amazing cross sectional tour for the short period of time that we were able to visit. We began our tour at Taylor Shellfish Hatchery in Quilcene, where we were enlightened by Benoit Eudeline on the intracacies of shellfish hatchery operations. We then headed south to Port Whitney Shellfish Hatchery and met with Matt Henderson and again were impressed by a different and more extensive approach to some of the hatchery production elements. From there, we stopped at Hama Hama Oyster Company and met with Adam James and Justin Stang who exposed us to different types of grow out technologies, and gave a tour of the processing area, and we then had an amazing selection of delicious shellfish courses for lunch at The Saloon. We headed south for the night and of course had our second delicious culinary experience at Chelsea Farms Oyster Bar, where the Chelsea Gem and geoduck were huge hits, as well as the company of Shina Wysocki! The next day, we met with Bill Dewey at Taylor’s offices and processing operations in Shelton. We discussed the amazing history of not just Taylor’s operations but also the Washington shellfish industry as a whole. We then toured Taylor’s and Chelsea Farms’ Flupsy operations for an in depth look at the shellfish nursery process. And then we headed back to Seattle and wrapped up our tour at Snow & Company’s facilities to see progress on the Flupsy that they are building to support the Port’s new partnership with San Diego Bay Aquaculture.

Once again, big THANK YOU’s to Becky, Connie, and Margaret from the Association and to all the other members that met us with a warm welcome. Every step of the way we were touched by the deep rooted traditions and multi-generational aspects of all the operations we visited. We will always be grateful for the amazing experience and for how much we learned. We look forward to sharing our progress from San Diego as we embark on new aquaculture and blue technology initiatives.

Ferry Trip from Seattle to Bainbridge Island. From left to right: Commissioner Dan Malcolm, President and CEO Randa Coniglio, Assistant Vice President of External Relations Job Nelson, Assistant Vice President of Planning and Green Port, and Commissioner Marshall Merrifield. (Photo credit Eileen Maher)

Taylor Shellfish Hatchery in Quilcene, WA: Commissioner’s Malcolm and Merrifield. (Photo credit Eileen Maher)

Point Whitney Shellfish Hatchery: Checking out oyster seed. (Photo credit Eileen Maher)

Matt Henderson from Point Whitney Shellfish Hatchery with Commissioner Malcolm and Randa Coniglio. (Photo credit Becky Mabardy)

Commissioner’s Merrifield and Malcolm and Jason Giffen enjoying oysters at Hama Hama Saloon. (Photo credit Eileen Maher)

Bill Dewey showing oyster seed to Commissioner’s Merrifield and Malcolm, and Paula Sylvia, Program Manager of Aquaculture. (Photo credit Eileen Maher)

Chelsea Farms Flupsy Operation: From left to right (bottom): ??? from Chelsea Farms, Port Program Manager of Aquaculture Paula Sylvia, Assistant Vice President of Planning and Green Port Jason Giffen, Commissioner Dan Malcolm, Commissioner Marshall Merrifield, Chelsea Farms Shina Wysocki, PCSGA Becky Mabardy, (top): Assistant Vice President External Relations Job Nelson, President and CEO Randa Coniglio, and Director of Aquaculture and Blue Technology Eileen Maher. (Photo credit Connie Smith)

Commissioners Merrifield and Malcolm celebrating Flupsy construction progress.

International Coastal Clean-up – 2017

Many thanks to all those around the world who participated in the International Coastal Cleanup on September 16th. PCSGA is honored to continue support for Washington CoastSavers with dumpsters and shellfish growers who contribute to this global debris removal effort.

(above) Members of the Olympic Peninsula Rowing Association adopted Ediz Hook during this month’s International Coastal Cleanup. (Sarah Forshaw)

Cleanup removes some 6 tons of debris from Pacific, Strait beaches

Leah Leach – Mon Sep 25th, 2017 2:07pm (PENINSULADAILYNEWS.COM)

More than 650 volunteers cleared some 6 tons of debris from Washington’s Pacific Coast and Strait of Juan de Fuca beaches during the International Coastal Cleanup, said the coordinator of Washington CoastSavers.

Volunteers cleaned more than 50 beaches along the outer coast and the Strait on Sept. 16, said Jon Schmidt of Sequim, Washington CoastSavers coordinator.

The Ocean Conservancy organizes the International Coastal Cleanup (ICC) on the third Saturday of September. Washington CoastSavers serves as the cleanup coordinator in Washington state.

“Our volunteers who clean the wilderness coast of Olympic National Park often have to hike several miles just to get to the beach,” Schmidt said.

(Read entire article)

Job Opportunity: Pacific Oyster Broodstock Repository Coordinator in Bay Center WA (Taylor Shellfish Farms)

Manage the general day-to-day husbandry of Pacific oyster broodstock on a mid-sized, intertidal, raised-gear oyster farm; with the goal of rearing broodstock to breeding maturity, and maintaining an inventory of useable broodstock for a variety of breeding purposes. Learn more and apply HERE.

Shellfish harvest resumes in Samish Bay

 

Scott Blau of Blau Oyster Co. and Bill Dewey of Taylor Shellfish Farms said the Samish Bay companies are glad that oyster harvest has resumed.

“Samish is a key growing area for us for our very popular shigoku oysters and we are looking forward to getting them back on line,” Dewey said.

 

 

Job Opportunity: South Bend Farm Manager (Taylor Shellfish Farms)

This manager position is an on the ground manager. Attendance on the tide is required, be it
day or night. Organizing and coordinating all people and activities that occur on the described
farm will be required in this position. This position is based out of South Bend, WA on Willapa
Bay. Full details HERE!

Job Opportunity: Director of Clam & Oyster Farming (Taylor Shellfish Farms)

This director position is responsible for coordinating and directing Farm Managers to optimize
each farm’s production while meeting the company’s production schedules. Work hours will be
balanced between administrative duties and tidal cycle demands. In addition to office hours, this
position will require most daylight tides and half the night tides to be worked. This position will
be based out of the Taylor Shellfish Farms headquarters in Shelton, WA. Full details HERE!

Job Opportunity: Samish Flip Bag Farm Manager (Taylor Shellfish Farms)

This manager position is an on the ground manager. Specifically, this position will manage all
aspects of the flip bag farm throughout Samish Bay. Attendance on the tide is required, be it
day or night. Organizing and coordinating all people and activities that occur on the described
farm will be required in this position. Full details HERE!

Job Opportunity: Samish Bay Oyster Farm Manager (Taylor Shellfish Farms)

This manager position is an on the ground manager. Specifically, this position will manage all
aspects off-bottom oyster longlines and on bottom oyster crops throughout Samish Bay. This
includes the East side, West side, as well as the “Schimke” property. Attendance on the tide is
required, be it day or night. Organizing and coordinating all people and activities that occur on
the described farm will be required in this position. This position is based out of our Samish Bay
location in Bow, WA. Full details HERE!

Job Opportunity as Shellfish Hatchery Technician with Manatee Holdings Ltd

Manatee Holdings Ltd is seeking an energetic individual to join the team at its shellfish hatchery near Courtenay, BC. Hatchery operations are focused on commercial production of geoduck and oyster seed as well as research and development of emerging aquaculture species such as sea urchins. The company has pioneered geoduck culture in BC and currently manages an ocean farm in addition to its onshore facility. The successful candidate will work with the hatchery team to meet the ever changing needs of shellfish hatchery production. Please see full job description HERE!

August ecosystem services photo contest winner

Congratulations to the winner of this month’s Ecosystem Services Photo Contest, Duane Fagergren of Calm Cove Oyster Co. 

Under this mat of green macro algae (Enteromorpha sp) lies this year’s crop of yearling single Pacifics. The oysters consume phytoplankton, and excrete feces, pseudo feces, and ammonia in a mixture that serves to fertilize this luxurious crop of seaweed. The lush crop also provides habitat for crab (graceful crabs mostly) and fish (shiner perch, stag horn sculpin, and bay pipefish). The downside of this heavy growth is a mat that makes oysters grow slower, clams come to the surface of the beach and can’t dig themselves back in, and likely oxygen debt as the algae naturally dies and decomposes.

Thank you to all who submitted some great photos this month.

Photos and captions for the next contest are due September 15th. Contest link for details to enter.