PCSGA May Board Meeting

Beautiful day on Willapa Bay with the PCSGA board. Great oyster experience at low tide thru the hail storms and sun breaks! Learning more about burrowing shrimp, bay health, and the ebb and flow of natural cycles! #oystersavestheday #oystersavesthebay

Facing Climate Change: Oyster Farmers

 

Facing Climate Change: Oyster Farmers

Kathleen Nisbet and her father, Dave, farm oysters in Washington’s Willapa Bay. They recently shifted some of their business to Hawai’i, after ocean acidification started killing baby oysters in local hatcheries.

Over the past 250 years, the world’s oceans have absorbed about 25 percent of the carbon dioxide that humans have put into the air by burning fossil fuels. Carbon dioxide lowers the pH of oceans, turning waters more acidic. The Northwest is home to some of the most corrosive waters on earth. Washington State in particular is an ocean acidification hotspot due to coastal upwelling that delivers cold water, low in pH and rich in carbon dioxide, from the deep ocean to its coasts. In Hawai’i, where coastal upwelling does not occur, the water is warmer and acidity is increasing less rapidly.

Ocean acidification makes it more difficult for oyster larvae and young oysters to grow and maintain their protective shells. Shells may even dissolve in increasingly acidic waters, leading to higher mortality in young oysters. Dave finds success in shipping baby oysters from Hawai’i and maturing them in Willapa Bay.

The Nisbet’s story may be unique, but they are not alone. Washington supports the most productive commercial shellfish operation on the West Coast, a multi-million dollar industry at risk. Yet the issue exceeds lost profits. Not all farmers can invest in warmer waters. Coastal tribes harvest wild shellfish for economic and subsistence uses. Healthy seas help build livelihoods in rural communities. So what next?

Under rising emissions scenarios, ocean acidity may increase 100 to 150 percent by the end of the century. In response, farmers are using new technologies to monitor the acidity levels of hatchery waters. Young scientists are devoting their careers to understanding risk and resilience. Former Washington Governor Gregoire formed a blue ribbon panel on ocean acidification and issued an Executive Order to implement key actions. Washington State is pioneering efforts to tackle ocean acidification so that its waters continue to serve as a source of prosperity and inspiration. We need all hands on deck.

June Ecosystem Services Photo Contest Winner

Congratulations to Dillon McEdward, winner of $100 and the PCSGA’s June Ecosystem Services Photo Contest!! 

His picture is of a large Stellar Sea Lion hauled out on a mussel rafts in Quilcene Bay, WA. Shellfish rafts play an accessory role as a safe haul out site for marine mammals, one which is away from beach disturbances and provides quick access to the water for feeding. Rafts also provide quick escape for sea lions and seals when orcas are present.

Submissions for the next photo contest are due on July 15th. The contest is open to the public. Find more information here: http://pcsga.org/ecosystems-services-photo-competition/ — at Quilcene Bay.

The Shellfish Growers 25th Annual Beach Cleanup of the Sound

On Thursday, March 23, the Pacific Coast Shellfish Growers Association (PCSGA) hosted a local tradition since 2001, the bi-annual Shellfish Industry Beach Cleanup. Local shellfish growers and the Department of Natural Resources collectively removed marine debris washed up along 120 miles of Puget Sound beaches. Sites included Eld, Totten, Henderson, Hammersley, Case, and Carr Inlets, Oakland Bay, and Squaxin, Harstine, McNeil, and Anderson Islands.

May Ecosystem Services Photo Contest Winner

Brian Kingzett is the winner of May’s Ecosystem Services Photo Contest and $100!!

Here, he shows Short Billed Dowitchers feeding in a complex of eelgrass and oysters at Goose Point Oysters in Willapa Bay. This complex of oysters and eelgrass produces biofilms and habitat for numerous small prey items for foraging shorebirds.

Submissions for the next photo contest are due on the June 15th. The contest is open to the public. Find more information here: http://pcsga.org/ecosystems-services-photo-competition/ — with Brian Kingzett at Willapa Bay.

April Ecosystem Services Photo Contest Winner

Congratulations to Bill Dewey, the winner of the April PCSGA Ecosystem Services Photo Contest and $100!! The photo shows a variety of macroalgae growing on the PVC nursery tubes and net tops on our Fisk Bar geoduck farm in Samish Bay Taylor Shellfish Farms. It also shows the eelgrass starting to fill back in around the tubes.

 

 

Submissions due on the 15th of every month. Contest is open to the public. Find more information here: http://pcsga.org/ecosystems-services-photo-competition/

 

Taylor Shellfish Customer Services & Marketing Administrator

The Customer Service & Marketing Administrator will be responsible for marketing, maintenance, and fulfillment of the Taylor Shellfish Farms ecommerce business. The administrator will be responsible for developing ecommerce promotional marketing campaigns, answering all customer service related calls and email and further development of the ecommerce product line. In addition, the position will work with the shipping team to order, pack and ship direct to consumers and chefs while meeting Taylor Shellfish’s quality guidelines. Customer Service and Marketing Ecommerce Job Desctription

March Ecosystem Services Photo Contest Winner

Congratulations to Emily Garlich of Kamilche Sea Farms, winner for the March Ecosystem Services Photo Contest and $100.

“The blue mussels growing on longlines of our mussel farm are busy feeding. White sea anemones are growing with them. The mussels are sucking in sea water filtering out phytoplankton helping to keep phytoplankton blooms in check. You can see their mantles, the tissue just inside the shell, making a siphon to channel the water over the gills toward the mouth for feeding.”