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PCSGA & CoastSavers Beach Clean-up, Willapa Bay & Grays Harbor, WA

Coastal shellfish growers in Willapa Bay and Grays Harbor WA, pitch in where it really counts! During the weekend of September 17-18, these shellfish farmers removed over 10,000 pounds of marine debris from their farms and upland areas! Partnering with the WA CoastSavers community cleanup for the International Coastal Cleanup, PCSGA paid for a half-dozen dumpsters along the south coast using SLURP funds. Jon Schmidt of WA CoastSavers said the donation saved CoastSavers an estimated $2,500 in dumpster rental and disposal costs. This was a great collaboration and joined recognition of coastal responsibly!

http://www.peninsuladailynews.com/news/volunteers-clear-tons-of-trash-from-coastal-strait-beaches/

PCSGA Fall Beach Clean-up, Puget Sound, WA

Since 2001, PCSGA South Puget Sound beach cleanups collect on average 80% marine debris which has nothing to do with shellfish farming. That debris includes chunks of Styrofoam that had broken loose from homeowners’ docks and floats, tires, drainage pipe, and patio furniture. Environmental stewardship is a core value of PCSGA because shellfish farms rely on healthy marine ecosystems for their livelihoods. Without good water quality, shellfish cannot properly grow or be harvested. The beach cleanup reflects that value of environmental stewardship.

Geoduck Festival, Shellfest, & Oysterfest, OH MY!

PCSGA attends an abundance of outreach events through out the year. Below are a few updates that brought summer to an end and welcomed the Pacific Northwest fall.

Wonderful photos from Allyn Days – Geoduck Festival! Rob Snyder, from Rob’s Shellfish, started the day introducing Derek Kilmer and his daughter to a geoduck. Read More

September Ecosystem Services Photo Contest Winner

scott-smithCongratulations to the winner of the September Ecosystem Services Photo Contest, Scott Smith of Taylor Shellfish Farms. These are natural set Pacific Oysters that spawned from a patch of diploids. Oysters attach themselves to rocks, shells or whatever stationary object they land on. As filter feeders, they play a crucial role in cleaning the body of water they grow in. The more oysters there are, the more filter feeding takes place and the cleaner our water.

2016 Conference for Women in Sustainable Agriculture

Registration Now Open for the 2016
Conference for Women in Sustainable Agriculture

“Building Connections towards Resiliency” this November

Portland, OR, August 18, 2016–The 5th National Conference for Women in Sustainable Agriculture will bring together farmers, educators, technical assistance providers and activists engaged in healthy food and farming to share educational and organization strategies, build technical and business skills, and address policy issues aimed at expanding the success of women farmers and ranchers. Read More

AUGUST ECOSYSTEM SERVICES PHOTO CONTEST WINNER

August Winner Duane FagergrenCongratulations to Duane Fagergren

While Duane was out digging clams in the early morning, he heard some commotion behind him. A family of river otters hangs out close to the house and one of their preferred foods is small graceful crabs, (Cancer Gracilis). The crabs use the seed bags (foreground) and this year’s yearling crop (background) to forage in. Read More

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