VIDEO: Shellfish Farms: Building Community

Funded by the Nereus Program as part of the Ocean Link Northwest communications project, this video centers around a shellfish grower in Willapa Bay in southwestern Washington. Graduate students Michael Quinlan and Rachel Lee worked with the Pacific Coast Shellfish Growers Association to show the symbiotic relationship between shellfish farms and the rural communities where they’re located.

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UMBC’s Colleen Burge helps show oyster aquaculture can limit disease in wild oysters

Excerpt: The potential spread of disease from farmed oysters to wild oysters is a frequent concern for oyster producers and consumers alike. Contrary to common perceptions, new UMBC research in Aquaculture Environment Interactions has found that properly managed oyster aquaculture operations can actually help limit the spread of disease among wild oysters.

“This is another line of evidence saying that oyster aquaculture can be a good thing,” says Colleen Burge, assistant professor of marine biotechnology at UMBC, and a co-author on the study.

“The established way of thinking is that disease spreads from aquaculture, but in fact aquaculture may limit disease in nearby wild populations,” adds Tal Ben-Horin, a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Rhode Island and the lead author on the study.

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December Ecosystems Services Photo Contest Winner

Congratulations Nyle Taylor

Nyle Taylor: This photo was taken by our divers off the east side of Harstine Island. In the background, you can just make out the shadows of two of our divers working to install mesh tubes underwater. In the process, schools of shiner perch and flounder are attracted into our work site to feed on organisms that have been brought to the surface of the sand through the tube installation process. The fish dart in and out from between the tubes. Despite our diver’s presence, the fish are highly active, even right in the vicinity of their work.

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Hatchery Technician – WHISKEY CREEK SHELLFISH HATCHERY

Position: Hatchery Technician
Pay Range: $12-20/hr, dependent on experience
Position includes full medical/dental insurance (after 90 day waiting period)
Start Date: January 4, 2019

Whiskey Creek Shellfish Hatchery, located in Netarts, Oregon, is one of the largest shellfish hatcheries in the U.S., with a 40 year history of supplying shellfish larvae to growers throughout the Pacific Northwest. The hatchery is currently seeking qualified applicants for a permanent, full time hatchery technician position. Duties will include all aspects of hatchery production, including (but not limited to) spawning oysters, mussels, and clams, maintaining larval groups, single seed production, broodstock management, and production of microalgae. Prior experience working in shellfish hatcheries is preferred, but not absolutely necessary- the employee will work closely with existing staff to train in these areas.

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November Ecosystem Services Photo Contest Winner

Congratulations Ben Reynolds

“I found these crabs hanging around one of many buoy line in Spencer Cove in the south Puget Sound. Buoys and lines are useful tools for anyone who utilizes the ocean and its natural resources as markers, way points, and boundaries. Kelp crabs, oblivious to the original intent of ropes, utilize these lines to buoys as a high point to capture passing food mimicking their namesake, kelp.”

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